Wandering Animals and Groceries   4 comments

Salinas is…interesting. Like all cruiser stronghold’s we’ve visited, it has it’s popular cafe where everyone goes for internet and refreshments. It has local characters, a crowded dinghy dock, and a colorful surrounding neighborhood. So far, my favorite thing about this place is the wandering animals. Unfortunately, I don’t have any pictures of these animals, as I haven’t been carrying my camera around. The streets in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico are alive with strays of all kinds. Most of them are mangy dogs or boney cats. In Salinas, I’ve seen some heartbreakingly cute puppies following their mothers around the neighborhood. I (almost)wanted to take them home with me!

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Salinas harbor. There’s usually a huge black bird on that blue boat’s mast but he

happened to be gone when I took this.

Puerto Rico has added a new kind of stray to the usual animal assortment we see in the streets. Lee and I were walking back to the marina from town yesterday when we encountered two horses grazing along the sidewalk in front of us. No joke. There were horses in the street. They were munching happily, oblivious to the passing traffic and to Lee and me on the sidewalk. They looked like someone had been taking care of them but there were no pastures or barns to be seen.

We also saw a couple of teenage guys riding feisty little horses bareback in the same area. They were hanging out in the park with their horses like American teenagers would with bicycles. We saw the same thing in Boqueron, come to think of it. A young guy rode his little palomino to the beach. All the horses down here seem to be on the small side. They look like I imagine the conquistadors horses looked.

Today, we were driving our rental car down the horse street when the same herd plus 2 (for a total of 4 horses) game sauntering down the pavement. ?!?!?!
Whose horses are these and why are they wandering around town alone? They’re so small I could almost fit one on the boat…

My second favorite thing about Salinas is the giant grocery store, Selectos, that we patronized today. Among other things, I purchased a box of very enticing cereal.

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Who can resist churros? Why don’t they have this in the US? I normally try to stay away from sugary cereals but, seriously, how could I pass this up? I learned about the history of churros from the back of the box. Apparently they were invented by shepherds, not amusement park vendors.

I can’t wait to dig into a bowl of Mini Cinnamon Churros with ice-cold milk. Oh wait, our refrigeration is broken again, maybe for good this time. We’re making due with ice for now but Lee is going to give the old fridge another try in a few days. Sometimes it just wants a little break.

Posted May 14, 2011 by Rachel in Uncategorized

4 responses to Wandering Animals and Groceries

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  1. haha! The line about the amusement parks cracked me up.

    Perhaps I can enlighten you on the urban horse situation. Back in our country town here in Brazil, this was a really common thing, too. People left their horses tied up in random spots around town. There was a lot of open land there, so at least they could leave horses in places where they could graze and stuff. Anyway, these horses do have owners. Their owners are almost always poor men who use their horses to pull their carts around town. They use their carts to pick up recycling that they’ve picked out of the trash cans and dumpsters around town. Most of them live in slums or tiny apartments where they can’t keep their horses, and some have day jobs. So they tie their horses up in a convenient place until they can attach it to their cart again!

    I took a picture once:
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_53kSrZoWBBA/SEnabGSz0qI/AAAAAAAAApo/tSlNi4LpSc8/s1600-h/horse+and+cart.jpg

    So I don’t know if it’s exactly the same situation where you are, but maybe it’s related.

    • Ahhh, that makes sense. Thanks for the pictures!
      I haven’t seen any carts around so I’m not sure if that’s what these horses are used for but I think you’re right about them having owners. Occasionally I see one with a rope around it’s neck or something.
      Maybe they’re just what the guys without cars ride around!

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